National Park Guides

Most Popular National Parks in Canada

POSTED ON January 10, 2024 BY Ralph S.


Introduction

If you’re a hiking enthusiast, trail runner, thru-hiker, or backpacker, the national parks in Canada should be on your bucket list. The country boasts 37 national parks and 10 national park reserves, according to Canada’s National Park Service (Parks Canada’s official website), each offering a unique experience to its visitors.

From rugged peaks and glacier-fed lakes to dense forests and diverse wildlife, the best national parks are a mecca for outdoor adventure enthusiasts.

In this blog post, we’ll delve into some of the most incredible national parks in Canada that you should add to your itinerary.

Silverlight Socks Medium Crew Black


  • FREE SHIPPING

  • LIFETIME GUARANTEE

SILVERLIGHT WINTER HIKING SOCKS

stars 627 reviews

Banff National Park

Banff National Park

    • Location: Canadian Rockies
    • Area: approximately 2,564 sq mi (6,641 sq km).
    • Established on: November 25, 1885, making it the oldest national park in Canada and the third oldest in the world.
  • Number of visitors: over 4.5 million visitors annually, making it one of the most visited national parks in North America.
  • Number of hiking trails: undefined
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 1000 miles (1,600 kilometers).
  • Lowest Point: Mistaya River at 1,280 meters above sea level
  • Highest Point: Mount Forbes at 11,850 feet (3,612 meters) above sea level

Nestled in the heart of the Canadian Rockies, Banff National Park is a backpacker’s paradise. The park is particularly famous for the turquoise waters of Lake Louise and scenic drives along the Icefields Parkway. Not only is it the first national park in Canada, but it is also among the best national parks, with over 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) of hiking trails, making it a perfect destination for hikers of all levels. You can hike to the summit of Sulphur Mountain, soak in the Banff Upper Hot Springs, or watch the sunset over Vermilion or Moraine Lake.

Waterton Lakes National Park

Waterton Lakes National Park

  • Location: Alberta, Canada
  • Area: About 195 sq mi (505 sq km)
  • Established on: May 30, 1895
  • Number of visitors: 525,000 visitors in 2021
  • Number of hiking trails: 13
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 120 miles (200 kilometers)
  • Lowest Point: Waterton Lake at 1,290 meters above sea level
  • Highest Point: Mount Blakiston at 9,547 feet (2,910 meters) above sea level

Waterton Lakes National Park is a unique blend of prairie and mountain landscapes, creating the perfect backdrop for your outdoor adventures. The park features an extensive network of hiking, biking, and horseback riding trails through the rolling hills and forests. Waterton Lakes National Park is also known for the iconic Prince of Wales Hotel, which boasts stunning views of the park, and Red Rock Canyon, where you can see the vibrant hues of the red rock formations.

Riding Mountain National Park

Riding Mountain National Park

  • Location: Manitoba, Canada
  • Area: Approximately 1,146 sq mi (2,969 sq km)
  • Established on: May 30, 1933
  • Number of visitors: Over 400,000 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: undefined
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 250 miles (400 kilometers).
  • Lowest Point: Manitoba Escarpment at 656 feet (200 meters) above sea level
  • Highest Point: Baldy Mountain at 2726 feet (831 meters) above sea level

Riding Mountain National Park is a diverse landscape, boasting everything from a boreal forest to pristine lakes and prairies. The park is a popular destination for outdoor activities such as hiking, camping, and wildlife viewing. You can hike to the top of the hill for stunning views of the surrounding area or paddle along Clear Lake’s crystal-clear waters.

Gros Morne National Park

Gros Morne National Park

  • Location: Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
  • Area: Approximately 697 sq mi (1,805 sq km)
  • Established on: October 1, 1973
  • Number of visitors: Over 233,200 in 2018
  • Number of hiking trails: 16
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 62 miles (100 kilometers).
  • Lowest Point: Sea level at the coastlines
  • Highest Point: Gros Morne Mountain at 2644 feet (806 meters) above sea level

Located in Newfoundland, Gros Morne National Park is a stunning landscape of fjords, mountains, and waterfalls. The park features over 62 miles (100 kilometers) of hiking trails that take you through diverse terrain and offer breathtaking views. You can also take a boat tour through the Western Brook Pond fjord or spot unique wildlife like moose, caribou, and black bears.

Wood Buffalo National Park

Wood Buffalo National Park

  • Location: Northwest Territories and Alberta, Canada
  • Area: Approximately 17,274 sq mi (44,741 sq km), the second-largest national park in the world
  • Established on: August 10, 1922
  • Number of visitors: about 2,400 in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: over 10
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 124 miles (200 kilometers).
  • Lowest Point: Little Buffalo River at 183 m (600 ft) above sea level
  • Highest Point: Mount Ptolemy at 8970 feet (2,734 meters) above sea level

Wood Buffalo National Park is Canada’s largest national park and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the Northwest Territories and Alberta. As the country’s largest national park, it spans over 17,274 sq mi (44,000 sq km) and is home to the world’s largest herd of free-roaming bison. The park also offers plenty of opportunities for wildlife viewing, fishing, and camping. Lastly, the park is designated Dark Sky Preserve, making it an ideal destination for stargazing.

Jasper National Park

Jasper National Park

  • Location: Canadian Rockies
  • Size: Approximately 4,335 sq mi (11,228 sq km), making it the largest national park in the Canadian Rockies
  • Established on: September 14, 1907
  • Number of visitors: over 2.4 million visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: approximately 38
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 620 miles (1,000 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: The Athabasca River at 3231 feet (985 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Columbia, at 12,408 feet (3,782 meters) above sea level.

Jasper National Park is the largest national park in the Canadian Rockies. It is a wilderness wonderland, with vast stretches of untouched forests and abundant wildlife. You can hike to stunning waterfalls, explore glaciers, or drive along one of the most scenic drives in North America, the Icefields Parkway. It boasts numerous trails, and one of the best hikes is the Skyline Trail, which offers breathtaking views of the park from the alpine meadows. In addition, the park features stunning lakes such as Maligne Lake and Pyramid Lake, where you can go paddling or fishing for trout.

Yoho National Park

Yoho National Park

  • Location: Rocky Mountains in British Columbia
  • Size: Approximately 507 sq mi (1,313 sq km)
  • Established on: October 10, 1886
  • Number of visitors: Over half a million visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: about 17
  • Total length of hiking trails: more than 248 miles (400 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Amiskwi River at 3,641 feet (1,110 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Goodsir, at 11,702 feet (3,567 meters) above sea level.

Yoho National Park Located in the rugged mountains of British Columbia. This park offers visitors a chance to explore a stunning collection of lakes, waterfalls, and glaciers. It is also home to Takakkaw Falls, the second-highest waterfall in Canada, and Emerald Lake, which gets its name from the captivating green color of its waters. Yoho National Park has a variety of hiking trails, ranging from easy to difficult. The Iceline Trail is one of the best hikes in the park, offering panoramic views of the glacier-fed rivers and valleys.

Fundy National Park

Fundy National Park

  • Location: New Brunswick, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 80 sq mi (207 sq km)
  • Established on: June 20, 1948
  • Number of visitors: about 350,000 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: about 25
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 62 miles (100 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: the Bay of Fundy at sea level
  • Highest point: Dickson Falls Trail at 820 feet (250 meters) above sea level.

Located in New Brunswick, Fundy National Park is a hidden gem waiting to be discovered. The park has a diverse landscape of boreal forests, rugged coastlines, and the world’s highest tides. You can hike through the Acadian Highlands, explore the famous Hopewell Rocks, or explore the ocean floor at low tide. Fundy National Park also offers opportunities for camping, wildlife viewing, and stargazing in one of the Canadian parks designated a dark sky preserve.

Elk Island National Park

Elk Island National Park

  • Location: Alberta, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 75 sq mi (194 sq km)
  • Established on: 1906 as a game reserve and on July 1, 1913, as a national park
  • Number of visitors: approximately 400,000 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: 11
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 51 miles (83 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Beaver Hills at 2,296 feet (700 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Columbia at 12,294 feet (3,747 meters) above sea level

Elk Island National Park is located just outside Edmonton, Alberta, and is home to the largest completely enclosed national park in Canada. The park is known for its conservation efforts for iconic Canadian species such as bison, elk, and moose. Visitors can also enjoy hiking, camping, birdwatching, or stargazing under some of the darkest skies in Canada. Elk Island National Park is a must-visit for anyone looking to experience the beauty of the Canadian prairies.

Bruce Peninsula National Park

Bruce Peninsula National Park

  • Location: Ontario, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 59 sq mi (154 sq km)
  • Established on: October 1, 1987
  • Number of visitors: over 460,000 in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: more than 10
  • Total Length of hiking trails: approximately 12.4 miles (20 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Lake Huron at 577 feet (176 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: The Bruce Trail at 889 feet (271 meters) above sea level

Bruce Peninsula National Park is a stunning destination in Ontario, known for its crystal-clear waters and rugged limestone cliffs. The park offers opportunities for swimming, snorkeling, and scuba diving in the turquoise waters of Georgian Bay. You can also explore ancient caves, hike to scenic viewpoints, or catch a glimpse of unique wildlife like black bears and coyotes.

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve

  • Location: Vancouver Island, British Columbia
  • Size: Approximately 197 sq mi (511 sq km)
  • Established on: June 20, 1970
  • Number of visitors: approximately 1.16 million in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: less than 15
  • Total length of hiking trails: less than 62 miles (100 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Sea level
  • Highest point: Hobiton Ridge, at 2,651 feet (9799 m) above sea level.

Located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Pacific Rim National Park Reserve is a must-visit for beach lovers and surfers. The park has three distinct regions: Long Beach, Broken Group Islands, and West Coast Trail. You can hike through lush rainforests, spot marine life along the coastline, or catch some waves at popular surfing spots like Cox Bay and Wickaninnish Beach.

Kluane National Park and Reserve

Kluane National Park and Reserve

  • Location: Yukon, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 8,500 sq mi (22,013 sq km)
  • Established on: April 1, 1972
  • Number of visitors: about 47.1 thousand in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: about 15 trails and 8 routes. Check the trail conditions here
  • Total length of hiking trails: over 149 miles (241 kilometers). Download trail map (PDF, 2.7 MB)
  • Lowest point: Kaskawulsh Glacier at 2,469 feet (750 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Logan, at 19,550 feet (5,959 meters) above sea level.

Kluane National Park and Reserve in the Yukon is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and home to Canada’s highest peak, Mount Logan. The park offers incredible opportunities for outdoor adventures such as hiking, wildlife viewing, and backcountry camping. You can also take a flightseeing tour over the glaciers or paddle through the stunning Kluane Lake.

Kootenay National Park

Kootenay National Park

  • Location: Canadian Rockies, British Columbia
  • Size: Approximately (543 sq mi) 1,406 sq km
  • Established on: April 21, 1920
  • Number of visitors: around 574 thousand in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: over 29 (12 short hikes, 8 day hikes, and 8 multi-day hikes)
  • Total length of hiking trails: over 124 miles (200 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Cross River at 1,120 meters above sea level
  • Highest point: Deltaform Mountain at 11,234 feet (3,424 meters) above sea level.

Kootenay National Park in British Columbia may be smaller than other national parks, but it is no less remarkable. The park has a network of trails that weave through dense boreal forests and alpine meadows, leading you to bright-blue glacial lakes and rushing waterfalls (you can get more information about the trails here). This national park is also known for its diverse landscape of rugged mountains, glaciers, hot springs, and turquoise lakes. You can soak in natural hot pools at Radium Hot Springs or hike to the famous Paint Potshot Springs, a perfect way to soothe your aching muscles after a long day hiking in the park.

Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park, British Columbia, Canada

  • Location: Canadian Rockies, British Columbia and Alberta
  • Size: Approximately 1,583 sq mi (4,101 sq km)
  • Established on: June 23, 1886, as a national reserve and on May 11, 1910, as a national park
  • Number of visitors: Over 3 million visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: about 158
  • Total length of hiking trails: about 745 miles (1,199 km).
  • Lowest point: Flathead River at 3,150 feet (960 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Sir Donald, at 10,774 feet (3,284 meters) above sea level.

Glacier National Park in British Columbia offers visitors a chance to explore the beauty of the Canadian Rockies. The park has over 400 glaciers, making it a paradise for hikers and photographers alike. You can also take a scenic drive along the famous Going-to-the-Sun Road, which offers breathtaking views of the park’s rugged mountains and turquoise glacial lakes.

Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site

Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site

  • Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 156 sq mi (404 sq km)
  • Established on: June 1, 1967
  • Number of visitors: approximately 75,000 in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: approximately 17
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 93 miles (150 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Tom, at 590 feet (180 meters) above sea level.

Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site is a haven for nature enthusiasts and history buffs alike. The park has old-growth forests, rivers, and secluded lakes. You can explore the petroglyphs and Mi’kmaw cultural sites or camp under some of the darkest skies in Eastern Canada. With its rich history and diverse natural beauty, Kejimkujik National Park is a must-visit for anyone traveling to Nova Scotia.

Auyuittuq National Park

Auyuittuq National Park

  • Location: Baffin Island, Nunavut
  • Size: Approximately 8,289 sq mi (21,470 sq km)
  • Established on: March 1, 1972
  • Number of visitors: Around 400 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: undefined
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 68 miles (110 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Davis Strait at sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Odin, at 7,044 feet (2,147 m) above sea level.

Auyuittuq National Park in Nunavut is a remote arctic paradise that offers visitors the chance to immerse themselves in Inuit culture and explore some of the most breathtaking landscapes in Canada. The park is home to towering mountains, glaciers, and fjords, making it a popular spot for hiking and camping expeditions. You can also learn about traditional Inuit hunting and fishing practices and spot unique arctic wildlife such as muskoxen and polar bears.

Ivvavik National Park

Stegosaurus Ridge, Ivvavik National Park, YT

  • Location: Yukon, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 3,925 sq mi (10,168 sq km)
  • Established on: April 22, 1984
  • Number of visitors: Around 100 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: undefined
  • Total length of hiking trails: undefined
  • Lowest point: Arctic Ocean at sea level
  • Highest point: Arthur Laing Peak at 5,787 feet (1,764 m) above sea level.

Ivvavik National Park in the Yukon is a place of untouched wilderness and stunning beauty. Located in the remote northern tip of Canada, this park offers visitors an opportunity to experience true isolation and reconnect with nature. The park is home to the Porcupine Caribou herd, and you can also spot other wildlife, such as grizzly bears, wolves, and arctic foxes. You can explore the park on guided trips or plan your backcountry adventure, but be prepared for a truly remote and rugged experience in this untouched gem of the Canadian National Park System.

Prince Albert National Park

Sunset, Waskesiu Lake, Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan

  • Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 1,496 sq mi (3,875 sq km)
  • Established on: March 24, 1927
  • Number of visitors: Over 250,000 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: about 25
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 93 miles (150 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: western side of the Waskesiu Hills at 1,601 feet (488 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: the eastern side of the Waskesiu Hills at 2,375 feet (724 meters) above sea level.

Nestled in the heart of Saskatchewan, Canada, Prince Albert National Park unfolds as a breathtaking tapestry of pristine wilderness and serene lakes. With Waskesiu Lake at its center, the park offers a playground for outdoor enthusiasts, inviting them to explore its network of hiking trails, paddle through crystal-clear waters, and witness the dance of the northern lights under the vast prairie sky. Prince Albert National Park stands as a testament to Parks Canada natural beauty.

Nahanni National Park Reserve

Nahanni National Park Reserve

  • Location: Northwest Territories, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 11,602 sq mi (30,050 sq km)
  • Established on: July 17, 1972
  • Number of visitors: Around 1,000 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: around 10
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 62 miles (100 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Liard River at 1,092 feet (333 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Nirvana, at 9,097 feet (2,773 meters) above sea level.

Nahanni National Park Reserve is a remote wilderness paradise located in Canada’s Northwest Territories. The park is home to Canada’s deepest river canyons, breathtaking waterfalls, and diverse wildlife, such as grizzly bears, wolves, and moose. You can explore the park through multi-day canoe trips, hiking trails, or scenic flights over the canyon.

Terra Nova National Park

Terra Nova National Park

  • Location: Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 154 sq mi (399 sq km)
  • Established on: October 1, 1957
  • Number of visitors: approximately 45,000 in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: about 12. Click here for more information
  • Total length of hiking trails: more than 50 miles (80 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Atlantic Ocean at sea level
  • Highest point: Southwest Head, at 784 feet (239 meters) above sea level.

Terra Nova National Park in Newfoundland and Labrador is a coastal wonderland that offers visitors a chance to explore rugged coastlines, pristine forests, and abundant wildlife. You can hike through the park’s numerous trails, enjoy a scenic drive along the winding roads, or relax on one of the beautiful beaches. The park is also known for its exceptional marine life, making it a popular spot for kayaking and whale-watching.

La Mauricie National Park

La Mauricie National Park

  • Location: Quebec, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 207 sq mi (536 sq km)
  • Established on: August 22, 1970
  • Number of visitors: nearly 279, 000 in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: undefined
  • Total length of hiking trails: over 68 miles (110 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Mekinac River at approximately 499 feet (152 meters) above sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Boucherie, at around 1,676 feet (511 meters) above sea level.

La Mauricie National Park in Quebec is a beautiful blend of Canadian shield and mixed forests. The park offers a variety of outdoor activities, such as hiking, canoeing, and camping. It is also home to over 50 species of mammals, including beavers, otters, and black bears. The park’s breathtaking landscapes and tranquil lakes make it a popular spot for nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts.

Prince Edward Island National Park

Prince Edward Island National Park

  • Location: Prince Edward Island, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 10 sq mi (27 sq km)
  • Established on: May 30, 1937
  • Number of visitors: around 756,243 in 2019/20
  • Number of hiking trails: about 16
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 50 miles (80 kilometers). Download a PEI National Park Trail Guide (6.05 MB)
  • Lowest point: Gulf of St. Lawrence at sea level
  • Highest point: Springton Peak at 460 feet (140 meters) above sea level.

Prince Edward Island National Park boasts an idyllic setting of rolling dunes, red sand beaches, and a picturesque coastline. This maritime treasure offers visitors a variety of activities, such as hiking, cycling, and bird watching. The park houses abundant wildlife, including the endangered piping plover. With its charming lighthouses and quaint towns, Prince Edward Island National Park captures the hearts of all who visit.

Forillon National Park

Forillon National Park

  • Location: Quebec, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 94 sq mi (245 sq km)
  • Established on: June 8, 1970
  • Number of visitors: Over 150,000 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: about 11, with most being part of the International Appalachian Trail (IAT)
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 93 miles (150 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Gulf of Saint Lawrence at sea level
  • Highest point: Mont-Saint-Alban, at 928 feet (283 meters) above sea level.

Forillon National Park in Quebec is a rugged coastal park with dramatic cliffs, sandy beaches, and stunning ocean views. The park is home to over 230 species of birds and various marine mammals, including seals and whales. Visitors can explore the park through its many hiking trails, go camping under the stars, or take a scenic drive along the coastline.

Wapusk National Park

Wapusk National Park

  • Location: Manitoba, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 4,430 sq mi (11,475 sq km)
  • Established on: April 24, 1996
  • Number of visitors: around 150 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: None
  • Total length of hiking trails: N/A
  • Lowest point: Hudson Bay at sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Caribou, at 2,700 feet (823 meters) above sea level.

Located on the western coast of Hudson Bay in Manitoba, Wapusk National Park is a remote and wild wonderland. The park is home to one of the world’s largest polar bear maternity denning areas, making it a popular spot for polar bear viewing tours. The park also boasts diverse tundra ecosystems, with over 900 plant species and various bird and mammal species. Due to its remote location and delicate ecosystem, access to the park is limited, making it a truly unique and pristine wilderness experience.

Kouchibouguac National Park

📍Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick

  • Location: New Brunswick, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 92 sq mi (238 sq km)
  • Established on: June 9, 1969
  • Number of visitors: approximately 243,400 in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: 10 easy-to-moderate trails. Find out more about the trails here
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 35 miles (66 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Kouchibouguac Bay at sea level
  • Highest point: None, as the park is mostly flat with a few small hills.

Kouchibouguac National Park in New Brunswick is a diverse and dynamic coastal park offering a mix of forests, bogs, salt marshes, and sandy beaches. The park is also home to various species of plants and animals, including the endangered piping plover. Visitors can explore the park through hiking trails, cycling routes, and water activities such as kayaking and swimming. The park also has a rich cultural history, with historic Mi’kmaq settlements and artifacts scattered throughout the area. So, it is a perfect place for nature enthusiasts, history buffs, and outdoor adventurers alike.

Cape Breton Highlands National

view from the skyline trail, Cape Breton Highlands National Park along the west coast of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

  • Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 366 sq mi (949 sq km)
  • Established on: October 20, 1936
  • Number of visitors: approximately 277,200 in the fiscal year 2022/23
  • Number of hiking trails: over 26 trails
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 60 miles (97 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Atlantic Ocean at sea level
  • Highest point: White Hill, at 1,748 feet (533 meters) above sea level.

Nestled in the heart of Cape Breton Island, Canada, lies the breathtaking Cape Breton Highlands National Park. This stunning park offers a diverse landscape of rugged coastlines, lush forests, and majestic mountains. Visitors can hike through the many trails, take in the panoramic views from the scenic drive along the world-famous Cabot Trail, or camp under the stars. Cape Breton Highlands National Park is also home to various wildlife species, such as moose and bald eagles, making it a popular spot for nature enthusiasts.

Georgian Bay Islands National Park

Georgian Bay Islands National Park

  • Location: Ontario, Canada
  • Size: Approximately 5.2 sq mi (13.5 sq km)
  • Established on: October 9, 1929
  • Number of visitors: over 40,000 visitors annually
  • Number of hiking trails: over 12
  • Total length of hiking trails: approximately 24 miles (40 kilometers).
  • Lowest point: Georgian Bay at sea level
  • Highest point: Mount Nemo, at 541 feet (165 meters) above sea level.

Located at the southern tip of Ontario, Georgian Bay Islands National Park is a stunning island escape. The park is the smallest national park in Canada, with over 60 islands, of which only a few are accessible to visitors. These islands boast beautiful beaches, scenic hiking trails, and unique geological formations like Flowerpot Island. Visitors can also enjoy camping, kayaking, and wildlife viewing in this serene and picturesque park.

Conclusion

Canada’s national parks offer some of the most spectacular and diverse landscapes in North America, and it’s no wonder hikers, trail runners, thru-hikers, and backpackers flock to these regions every year.

Whether planning a day hike in one of the darkest dark sky preserves or a multi-day trek in Nááts’įhch’oh National Park Reserve, Canadian national parks have got you covered. You can visit Banff National Park for a quintessential Rockies experience, explore Jasper’s pristine wilderness, or hike to Takakkaw Falls in Yoho for breathtaking views.

Silverlight Socks Medium Crew Black


  • FREE SHIPPING

  • LIFETIME GUARANTEE

SILVERLIGHT WINTER HIKING SOCKS

stars 627 reviews

Make sure to explore additional parks in our National Park Guides before departing.


RALPH S.

Ralph S. is the founder of Silverlight, an avid hiker and trail runner he enjoys spending time outdoors, riding his motorcycle and swimming at the beach when he's not busy replying to customers or developing new Silverlight gear.

Keep Warm with Silverlight Winter Socks

Shop Nowx

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *